16 August 2012

Scheherazade's Moon #9

copyright (c) 2012, Sharon Edmunds
Scheherazade's Moon #9, Mixed Media on Vellum, 14" x 11"


Scheherazade's Moon. Night Number 410.



$875
(Unframed, + S&H)


16 comments:

  1. Hi Sharon,
    I once saw a exhibition of miniature paintings done by artists from different areas of India. The gallery supplied magnifying glasses for the viewer to get a close look at the details. Each hand in all of the paintings had gold flourishing patterns, like yours, on them. I love your markings on the hand and the background behind it. I'd really like a magnifying glass! It has the feeling of a peace offering.....or am I way off? Love #9.

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    1. Hi Carole! Thank you!

      Yes, this piece's roots would be similar! I have adored Islamic Tile Work since my earliest memories, so I have seen many examples and know something of the history. This series is based on Scheherazade. Many would say - though some would argue - that her story is originally from Persia. Some of my very favorite Tile Work was done in Persia during the Safavid Empire. (The hand section in this piece is based loosely on this work.) During this time, there were also artists working on Manuscript Illumination and Miniature Paintings. It would take too long here to explain the history of all this, but you will notice similarities of Safavid Empire Art (Persia), Mughal Empire Art (India), and Ottoman Empire Art (Turkey). If you want a closer look at this, right click on your mouse and click on 'Open link in new tab'. You'll loose some resolution, but it will be big.

      You mention 'It has the feeling of a peace offering.' I love that you feel/see it that way. You can not be off on your feelings. I usually do not talk about my work this way, because I truly believe that the joy of visual art is that because it usually lacks language, it is open to everyone's personal interpretation. Because I've gone into the roots of this piece, I will say that the 'open right hand' - used here - is known as a Hamsa. It was originally an Arabic symbol of divine protection or blessing. It is known now by many names and shares it's symbolism with many cultures. A Hamsa is usually a small stylized, very intricately worked amulet, but was also used in tile work or painted on walls.

      Sorry for a response in book form. I'm glad you love it!

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    1. Hello Eric! After the response above, I'm going to keep this brief! Thank you! ;-)

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  3. Hi Sharon this is my favourite
    I agree with carole re the henna hand for some reason it makes me think 'reach for happiness' perhaps I am projecting

    Sorry about absence you often pop into my thoughts ciao ciao xxx julie

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    1. Hi Julie, I've missed you! Hope all is going well. You must be so ready for Springtime.

      Glad to hear this is your favorite! I'm loving the 'reach for happiness' interpretation!

      xxx Sharon

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  4. Your composition is wonderful and the pull from the hand to the leaved branch is exquisite. For me it has a moment of time standing still...the colors speak of night and the detail amazing. I like this so much and find myself staring at all the intricate pattern. Is this mostly acrylic?

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    1. Hello Mary Ann! Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts. Much of who we are is created in those moments when time stands still.

      I'm really happy you're enjoying this! Creating those intricate patterns was almost hypnotic. Strangely enough, this piece has the least acrylic paint of all the pieces in this series so far. Most of it is water soluble printing ink.

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  5. Hello Sharon,
    Another amazing work, it has everything - elements so rich in symbolism, colors, composition, everything speaks to me, beautiful!

    Elena

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    1. Hello Elena! Thank you so much! This piece was an intense journey. I'm delighted that it speaks to you.

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  6. Hi Sharon-hope you're enjoying your summer--how fast it goes! This has such an Oriental feel to it. I like that mirroring of the five fingers and the 5 palm branches. Nice rich blues!

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    1. Hi Stephanie! Palm to Palm! Yes! I'm smiling. Glad you noticed! Thank you!

      Summer here has been extremely warm and mostly wonderful. I haven't seen so many blue sky days in a long, long time. I don't want to think about how fast it is going. Hope you're enjoying your summer, too.

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  7. Me voici encore une fois, attiré par ton monde d'artiste et fasciné par ce jeu de couleurs que tu maîtrises si bien. Cette transparence des bleus, cette fragrance de la lumière que l'on perçoit tout au long de ton chemin initiatique ne suffit pas à masquer la femme que tu es. D'une générosité et d'un altruisme naturels, tu fais de ces qualités,des armes contre ce monde abscons et tu lui imposes un ordre suprême, celui de la poésie et de l'amour. Nous voici cheminant auprès de Shéhérazade, au clair de lune dans les palais orientaux tandis que déjà, ton esprit fertile et inspiré imagine déjà le prochain tableau.
    Monde sans frontière, monde sans haine que le tiens, monde nous apprenant à prendre le chemin de l'humanité.
    Que demander de mieux, chère Sharon.
    Belle soirée sous la lune.
    Ton ami,

    Roger

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    1. Cher Roger! Bonjour! Merci beaucoup. Vous n'avez pas idée combien il est doux pour moi d'entendre vos mots en ce moment. De savoir que quelqu'un a vraiment vu et ressenti ce qui est là. Qu'est-ce compells moi de poursuivre dans cette voie et ces nuits de Schéhérazade. Cette série a commencé comme un hommage à ma grand-mère, une femme du désert du Proche-Orient. C'est une histoire très personnelle pour moi. Une histoire qui détient la sagesse et la gentillesse et de l'amour et de grande beauté à sa base. Il est intemporel, et pourtant si beaucoup de ce temps. Et oui, c'est un voyage recherche d'un monde sans peur, un monde sans haine, un monde qui apprend à prendre le chemin de l'humanité.

      Merci, Roger. Je suis désolé que ça m'a pris autant de temps pour répondre. Mon monde n'a pas été très aimable ces derniers temps. Je suis fou de revenir aux choses qui importent. J'espère que votre monde vous traite gentiment et tout va bien.

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  8. Cette longue période qui ressemble à une pause que je respecte, me donne simplement envie de vous saluer et de vous dire bonsoir en espérant que tout se passe bien dans votre.
    Belle soirée à vous, chère Sharon.
    Avec mon amitié.
    Roger

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  9. Cette longue absence ne me dit rien de bon. J'espère que ce n'est simplement qu'une distance du blog prise de ta part sans autre conséquences fâcheuses pour vous.
    Une de mes installations de ce jour vous est dédiée.
    Avec toute mon amitié
    Au plaisir de vous lire,

    Roger

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